The War on Drugs Review: Lost in the Dream

The War on Drugs

Lost in the Dream

The War on Drugs Lost in the Dream album cover art

Philly indie rockers the War on Drugs admittedly hit my sweet spot when it comes to their sound: they create dreamy psychedelic rock with an Americana soul, sort of Wilco’s experimental side under a cloud of guitar haze. The band started out with 2008’s freewheeling Wagonwheel Blues, where they had fuzz-rocker Kurt Vile in their band as sort of a lo-fi Dylan-worshipping indie band. Since, Kurt Vile has left to do his own thing (which we have loved every minute of), and since the War on Drugs have gotten even more similar to Vile’s music: hazy, sonic explorations filled with atmospheric guitar, synth sounds, and front man Adam Granduciel’s wistful vocals. On their latest, Lost in the Dream, the band has never sounded so confident musically and anxious emotionally, making this a thrilling and wistful ride.
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LxListening: Consistency is a Virtue

psychedelic

Keeping in line with our post yesterday, highlighting what we believe to be the ten best psychedelic rock albums of all time, I decided to cull a few choice nuggets from my personal library and say a few words.  Seeing as our list of albums yesterday stuck mostly to the classics (and understandably so), I decided to keep most of the tracks on here a bit more modern.  In a bit of a hurry today, so I’ll let you get right to the action.  Enjoy.

Kurt Vile – “Wakin on a Pretty Day”

Todd, Wes, and I had a little text conversation yesterday about Kurt Vile’s new album, Wakin on a Pretty Daze, and while we couldn’t decide whether it was superior to his previous release (Smoke Ring For My Halo), we all agreed its pretty damn good.  Album opener, “Wakin on a Pretty Day”, to me, shows Vile is becoming completely comfortable in his strengths and abilities.  And unlike many of the bands that are harkening back to another time that are much-lauded today, I feel Vile alludes to his influences more than mimics them.
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