Top Ten Thursday: Top Ten Posthumous Albums

rip

With the posthumous release this week of Jimi Hendrix’s People, Hell and Angels, which admittedly none of us has really dug into yet, we decided to explore the strange wonderful world of albums released after an artist’s death.  Most of these artists died untimely deaths, but the albums on this list range from those completed (or nearly completed) while the artist was still alive to those compiled from unreleased catalogs years after.  These albums also vary between solo artists dying to just a singular (but irreplaceable) member of a band dying.  For our purposes, we decided to leave out live albums, because that would be opening an entire barrel of monkeys that we simply didn’t want to deal with.  Enjoy, and as always let us know what we excluded, missed, or exactly how stupid we are.

10. Johnny Cash – American V:  A Hundred Highways

cash

V may not be the finest of Johnny Cash’s American recordings, but it is still a fine album by the greatest country artist of all time.  Cash also holds the distinction as the only member of this list who lived his life to natural completion.  Highlights include “Four Strong Winds”, “God’s Gonna Cut You Down”, and “Help Me”.
Continue reading “Top Ten Thursday: Top Ten Posthumous Albums”

Top Ten Thursday: The Hologrammy’s

tupac, hologram, coachella, digital

All it took was the one and only Coachella music festival to bring Tupac back from the dead…at least in Obi-Wan Kenobi hologram form.  A hundred grand plus and the unequaled genius of Dr. Dre was what proved necessary to display Tupac’s hologram performing “Hail Mary” and “2 of Amerikaz Gangstaz” with Snoop Dogg (for those with a more technical interest in the technology used, see this article).  The shocker is that, from the youtube videos and first-hand reports, the hologram actually looked pretty good.  This may not prompt the esteemed writers of LxL to rush out and buy tickets for the inevitable tour of Tupac reborn (who am I kidding, I’m in), but it did get the ball rolling on which deceased musicians we would like to see show up at a music festival near us.  Our preference would be that these legends show up in hologram form, as opposed to zombified (aka Bob Dylan’s most recent tours), because zombies give us the willies.  Enjoy, and let us know who you would like to see brought to computer-generated life.

10. Notorious B.I.G./Ol’ Dirty Bastard

biggy, notorious, crown, king, close-up

Alright, so maybe the connection between Notorious and ODB are tenuous at best (Jay-Z sampled ODB’s “Brooklyn Zoo” for his track “Brooklyn’s Finest”, which contains a verse by Notorious).  But with the power of post-humus production, we would like to see a Watch The Throne-esque collaboration featuring Big Poppa and Big Baby Jesus in a feast for the ears.  Yes, ODB went by Big Baby Jesus for a period of time during his late-career nosedive. 

Continue reading “Top Ten Thursday: The Hologrammy’s”

1999: A Small Grammy Miracle

1999:  A Small Grammy Miracle

grammy rap nominees, 1999, album, cover, art

In the past week, a lot of venom has been aimed at the Grammy’s, and I am generally in full agreement of Todd and Wes’ remarks.  But, I must give credit where credit is due and recognize that The Grammy’s supplied me with what was a fantastic primer in hip-hop at a pretty young age.  Here is a little background.

Continue reading “1999: A Small Grammy Miracle”

Top Ten Thursday: Indubitably Great Debuts

In accordance with our debut this week, we thought it would be appropriate if we gave LxL’s Top Ten Debuts of all time.

1. Led Zeppelin- Led Zeppelin 

Loud, rebellious and unbelievably bluesy; this is what rock n’ roll is supposed to sound like. It’s funny to think that in ’69 when this was released, that the critics ripped it apart. Shows how much they know.
Continue reading “Top Ten Thursday: Indubitably Great Debuts”